• Issue

    Insect Conservation and Diversity: Volume 13, Issue 6

    i-iii, 519-638
    November 2020

Issue Information

Free Access

Issue Information

  • Pages: i-iii
  • First Published: 18 November 2020

Major Reviews

Field margin floral enhancements increase pollinator diversity at the field edge but show no consistent spillover into the crop field: a meta-analysis

  • Pages: 519-531
  • First Published: 06 October 2020
Description unavailable

  • Studies on the effect of field margin floral enhancements on pollinators have focused more on their diversity at the edge and less on how it affects pollinators within fields and crop yields.
  • We observed that the management tools that increase the abundance and richness of pollinators are mainly restored edges and edges with herbaceous plants, particularly for hoverflies and wild bees.
  • Field margin floral enhancements increased the abundance and richness of pollinators at the edge but had no consistent effect within fields and had no effects on crop yield.

Techniques & Methodology

Multiple methods of assessing nectar foraging conditions indicate peak foraging difficulty in late season

  • Pages: 532-542
  • First Published: 23 May 2020
Description unavailable

  • Knowledge of how foraging conditions vary seasonally could help in design of effective food supplementation initiatives aimed at conserving pollinators.
  • We examined eight potential proxy variables that could be used to gauge foraging difficulty for nectar in the environment, seven of which had considerable agreement among each other.
  • Guarding and fighting levels at honey bee hive entrances are recommended, as they correlated with most other variables and are among the least difficult to obtain.

Original Articles

Open Access

Thug life: bramble (Rubus fruticosus L. agg.) is a valuable foraging resource for honeybees and diverse flower-visiting insects

  • Pages: 543-557
  • First Published: 17 July 2020
Description unavailable

  1. Bramble has an important ecological role for flower-visiting insects despite often being considered an undesirable plant. Many species of insect forage on bramble flowers, including species of conservation concern.
  2. Pollen trapping at 12 honeybee hives in four locations showed that 31% of pollen pellets collected by honeybees from late May to early August were bramble.
  3. Bramble is locally common and abundant within the co-flowering plant community and grows in many rural and urban habitat types.

One-size does not fit all: at-risk bumble bee habitat management requires species-specific local and landscape considerations

  • Pages: 558-570
  • First Published: 06 May 2020
Description unavailable

  • Landscape variables were more important than local or flowering plant species cover for two at-risk bumble bee species (Bombus terricola and Bombus pensylcvanicus) in Southern Ontario.
  • There were species specific differences in habitat characteristics for both landscape and resource variables
  • Floral resources were the most important resource throughout the three survey periods.

Native bee communities vary across three prairie ecoregions due to land use, climate, sampling method and bee life history traits

  • Pages: 571-584
  • First Published: 02 June 2020
Description unavailable

  • The abundance, richness and diversity of bee communities across a 650 km latitudinal transect of the North American prairies varied with land use and along ecological gradients.
  • Bee abundance and richness patterns were subject to interactions between ecological region and land use, highlighting the need for regional studies to understand bee community responses to these factors.
  • Cavity-nesting species were associated with rangelands and were less common in croplands compared to rangelands, suggesting they may be more sensitive to loss of rangeland habitat.

Native and agricultural grassland use by stable and declining bumble bees in Midwestern North America

  • Pages: 585-594
  • First Published: 18 September 2020
Description unavailable

  • Native plant dominant tallgrass prairie supported on average 1.75 times more bumble bees than exotic-dominant bison pasture and 3.5 times more bumble bees than exotic dominant cattle pastures.
  • Tallgrass prairie supported on average 1.5 times more bumble bee species than bison pastures and two times more species than cattle pastures.
  • Individual bumble bee species differed in their habitat preferences.

Wild bee declines linked to plant-pollinator network changes and plant species introductions

  • Pages: 595-605
  • First Published: 29 June 2020
Description unavailable

  • Plant-pollinator networks are becoming increasingly vulnerable to disturbance through intensifying land use and climate change
  • Here we characterise changes in wild bee plant-pollinator networks over the past 125 years and reveal a striking increase in exotic bee and plant taxa over time
  • Declining wild bee species have historic ties to locally extirpated, threatened, and endangered plant species

Open Access

Do single Pollard transects represent the local butterfly community? A case study from the Spitzberg near Tübingen, Germany

  • Pages: 606-616
  • First Published: 30 July 2020
Description unavailable
Density of butterflies at the Spitzberg near Tübingen, Germany

  • Total butterfly population size, density of individuals and species diversity pattern of the Spitzberg, a 624 ha study area, were recorded by intensive surveys.
  • Almost all butterfly species present at the Spitzberg were also recorded by two transects run by the German butterfly monitoring scheme (TMD).
  • Based on results of a species–habitat analyses, the location of TMD transects could be optimised by aiming to cover the complete butterfly diversity of the study area.

Open Access

Population dynamics of the butterfly Pyrgus armoricanus after translocation beyond its northern range margin

  • Pages: 617-629
  • First Published: 04 August 2020
Description unavailable

  • To study factors limiting Pyrgus armoricanus' distribution, translocation experiments were carried out within and beyond this butterflies' northern range margin, the populations being monitored for 8 years since.
  • Pyrgus armoricanus was able to survive in two sites north of its current range, with population growth being correlated with patch area and connectivity rather than climate.
  • This species is unlikely to track its shifting climatic niche due to its low dispersal ability and high habitat fragmentation, calling for a discussion of translocation for conservation.

Author Index

Free Access

Author Index

  • Pages: 630-631
  • First Published: 18 November 2020

Keywords Index

Free Access

Keywords Index

  • Pages: 632-634
  • First Published: 18 November 2020

List of Referees

Free Access

List of Referees

  • Pages: 635
  • First Published: 18 November 2020

Volume contents

Free Access

Volume contents

  • Pages: 636-638
  • First Published: 18 November 2020